Posts tagged “Skyscrapers

My London Journey | The New Emblem of London

IMG_3290_1If you ask me to pick only one favorite modern building from the beautiful London maybe I would say the Shard! The pyramidal glass tower is currently the tallest building in the European Union. The 87-storey mixed use skyscraper, complete with offices, apartments, a hotel and spa, retail areas, restaurants and a public viewing gallery was designed by the famous Italian architect Renzo Piano and replaced Southwark Towers, a 24-storey office block built in 1975. Standing approximately 309 metres high, the Shard is currently the third most expensive skyscraper in the world.

In 2014 the Shard has been awarded Emporis Skyscraper Award. The jury praised the Shard’s “unique glass fragment-shaped form and its sophisticated architectural implementation”, resulting in “a skyscraper that is recognized immediately and which is already considered London’s new emblem.”
Read more about the building here: archdailyIMG_0711_1Photographs are taken by me.


Chicago, Chicago, that toddling town!

I bet everyone of you know this song by Frank Sinatra! I love it, as much as I love Chicago. Well, I haven’t been there yet, but hopefully one day I will visit “that toddling town”. Until then, I will learn as much as I can about it! 😉
Do you remember my post about “Lake Point Tower“? It is one of my favorite skyscrapers in Chicago! (Photographs by Julie Rubesemi.rose and Lake Point Tower) Here are some facts about it:

  • Lake Point Tower is the only tall building in Chicago east of Lake Shore Drive!
  • Every window of every residential unit in the building has a view of Lake Michigan!
  • The building’s curves were calculated so residents cannot see into each other’s windows!

Click here to see the whole post about the building.
Lake Point Tower
Lake Point Tower
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lptfans/3992250475/

Marina city, designed by Bertrand Goldberg in 1959.

  •  The architect, Bertrand Goldberg was a student of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.
  • The complex consists of two high rise corncob-shaped 65-story towers. Nobody seems to know the real name of the towers, everybody knows them as the ‘corn cobs’.
  • The complex was built as a city within a city, featuring numerous on-site facilities including a theatre, gym, swimming pool, ice rink, bowling alley, several stores and restaurants, and of course, a marina.
  • Marina City was the first urban post-war high-rise residential complex in the United States and is widely credited with beginning the residential renaissance of American inner cities. Its model of mixed residential and office uses and high-rise towers with a base of parking has become a primary model for urban development in the United States and throughout the world, and has been widely copied throughout many cities internationally.
  • The bottom 19 floors form an exposed spiral parking ramp operated by valet with 896 parking spaces per building.

(Photography: douglaswhaleytallydailyphoto and drx.typepad)

John Hancock Center, designed by S.O.M / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill /

  • Stories: 100
  • Construction completed: 1969
  • The Hancock elevators are billed as the fastest in America, climbing 95 stories in 40 seconds.
  • 47 floors of the Hancock Center are residential. It is like a city unto itself, and people do not have to leave the building. The people who live there have their own post office, supermarket, day care center, shops, full-sized swimming pool, library, gym, and other amenities.
  • The residential portion of the building is its own election district. People who live here can vote without going below the 44th floor.
  • Though not visible from the outside, many of the residences in this building have screened-in balconies known as “sky terraces.”
  • In 2010, this building was named #1 on Chicago Magazine’s list of the Top 40 Buildings in Chicago.
  • On a clear day it is possible to see Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Michigan.


(Photography: Joe Ravi and Basil D Soufi via Wikipedia)

I hope that you will enjoy the videos!

Sources: Wikipedia and chicagoarchitecture