I ♥ Plovdiv | Part 2 of 3


 Check out the first part , if you missed it. 😉

The main street is a really nice place for a long walk, it is complete with coffee shops, stores and restaurants, and the buildings are so beautiful to look at while drinking your coffee. I have to admit I was quite surprised that many of them are fully restored.


The 
Ancient Stadium is another important monument of the ancient city. It was built in the 2nd century during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian.  It was approximately 240 meters long and 50 meters wide, and could seat up to 30 000 spectators. Unfortunately, only a small part of the northern section with 14 seat rows can be seen today, the larger part lies under the main street and a number of buildings.Model of the stadium. Photo: 
Ah! The beautiful Dzhumaya Mosque! Indeed, a true piece of art!
Dzhumaya Mosque is one of the oldest Ottoman religious buildings on the Balkans. It is also one of the biggest: it is an imposing rectangular building with a 33 m-by-27 m prayer hall. It reveals influences from Byzantine and old Bulgarian architectural techniques: two layers of brick laid on top of each layer of cut stone.
Houses of the old town of Plovdiv.

This house once belonged to Georgi Mavridi, a merchant from Plovdiv. Built in 1829-1830 by an unknown builder, it is a typical representative of the Plovdiv symmetrical house. Nowadays the house is used by the Union of Bulgarian Writers. 

Zlatio Boiadjiev
 was a Bulgarian painter. He is known for his portraits and landscapes, depicting mainly the Old Town of Plovdiv and village life in its vicinity.

The Art Gallery of Plovdiv was founded in the late 19th century. It possesses 5,000 pieces of art in four buildings. Since 1981 it has a section for Mexican art donated by Mexican painters in honour of the 1,300-year anniversary of the Bulgarian State.
The Church of the Holy Mother of God
  is a Bulgarian National Revival church. A small church existed on that place since the 9th century. The church was renovated in 1186 by the bishop of Plovdiv Constantine Pantehi and it became part of a monastery. Both the church and the monastery were destroyed when the Ottoman Turks conquered the city in 1371 during the course of the Bulgarian-Ottoman Wars. The current edifice was constructed in 1844 as the main church of the city. In 1881, three years after the Liberation of Bulgaria the architect Josef Schnitter constructed a three-story domed belfry near the western entrance of the church.


Sources: wikipediabulgariatravel

19 responses

  1. Oh, how I miss Bulgaria and its beauty!! ❤

    Like

    16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

    • You don’t live here no more???

      Like

      16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • UNFORTUNATELY not! 😥

        Like

        16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • So where do you live now?!

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        16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • I’m in Ireland now but BG is in my heart..

        Like

        16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • That was quick! You are full of surprises!

        Like

        16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • Haha, you’re not the only one who says that! There were some unexpected challenges as to why I had to move. Would have stayed if I could! Definitely will come back for a vacation!! Is it still +40C and sunny there?

        Like

        16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • Yes 🙂

        Like

        16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

  2. Nadia, there’s a way that geographical distance often dims perception: the farther away something is, the less real it can sometime seem. I not only like your photos, but even more, I appreciate how real you’ve made Plovdiv, at 6680 miles+/- from where I’m writing this, seem. Not all photos do that. Maybe in this case it’s because you’re were there and, since you are also sharing them on your blog, also in the present. Therein, I suppose, is where blogs have such great potential. In any case, thanks for sharing.

    Like

    16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

    • Ah, what a nice comment! I am so glad to hear that from you, Warren!!

      Like

      16/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

  3. Hi Nadia, Just wanted to let you know that I’ve added 2 photos from this post along with credits to your blog to my Pinterest site. Please let me know if you approve of that and, if not, I will remove them. Thanks, Warren

    Like

    17/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

    • No problem, Warren!! You are free to use any of my photographs. I am really happy that you want to share them with others 😉

      Like

      17/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

      • Thank you

        Like

        17/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

  4. Thanks for the tour; it was lovely

    Like

    17/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

    • You are welcome 😉

      Like

      17/08/2012 at 12:41 PMAug

  5. Amazing post!
    I love your blog!Good on ya!
    Cheers!

    Like

    22/08/2012 at 12:41 AMAug

  6. Pingback: My Trip to Burgas « Alz Blog

  7. Pingback: The Glozhene Monastery « Alz Blog

  8. Pingback: Posts about Bulgaria | Alz Blog

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