Deconstructivism (or Deconstruction)

Deconstructivism is a development of postmodern architecture that began in the late 1980s. It is characterized by ideas of fragmentation, an interest in manipulating ideas of a structure’s surface or skin, non-rectilinear shapes which serve to distort and dislocate some of the elements of architecture, such as structure and envelope. The finished visual appearance of buildings that exhibit the many deconstructivist “styles” is characterized by a stimulating unpredictability and a controlled chaos.
The attempt in deconstructivism throughout is to move architecture away from what its practitioners see as the constricting ‘rules’ of modernism such as “form follows function,” “purity of form,” and “truth to materials.” …via Wikipedia

DECONSTRUCTIVIST ARCHITECTS

Деконструктивизмът е течение в съвременната архитектура, възникнало в края на 80-те години на 20 век. Характерни за него са фрагментирането, манипулирането на външните повърхности на конструкцията, неправоъгълните форми, които служат за изкривяване и изместване на някои от основните принципи на архитектурата. В завършения си вид деконструктивистките сгради се стремят да създадат впечатление за непредвидимост и контролиран хаос.
Желанието на декоструктивъзма е да отдалечи архитектура от това, което проектиращите виждат като ограничителни “правила” на модернизма като “формата следва функцията”, “чистота на формата,” и “искренност на материалите.”  …от Уикипедия
Military History Museum in Dresden, Germany
Architect: Daniel Libeskind
Photography: © Hufton+Crow Photography (via)

The Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre in Hong Kong, China
Architect: Daniel Libeskind
Photography: Gollings Photography PTY Ltd. (via)

Extension to the Denver Art Museum,
Frederic C. Hamilton Building in Denver, CO ,USA
Architect: Daniel Libeskind
Photography: © Bitter Bredt (via)

18.36.54 house in Connecticut, USA
Architect: Daniel 
Libeskind 
Photography: © Nikolas Koenig (
via)

Guggenheim museum in Bilbao, Spain
Architect: Frank Ghehry
Photography: design-dautore

Hotel Marqués de Riscal in Elciego, Spain
Architect: Frank Ghehry
Photography: MIMOMOSS DESIGN, design-dautore

Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada
Architect: Frank Ghehry
Photography:  design-dautore

Public Library in Seattle, Washington, USA
Architect: Rem Koolhaas
Photography: DesignVerb!

14 responses

  1. Awesome lot!

    Like

    09/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

    • Glad you like it. I also like this style ( or architectural movement ) 😉

      Like

      09/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

  2. It makes my eyes tired,unacceptable for me.

    Like

    09/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

    • Thank you for the comment, Jarek.
      Well yes, you are right. Even that I like this style, sometimes it looks too aggressive for my taste.
      Well soon I will make posts about other architectural movements 😉 So stay tuned, maybe you will find something for your taste 😉

      Like

      09/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

  3. Hey Nadia… great post! Frank Gehry is one of my favourites… I’m so glad he was finally able to design something here in Toronto (since he was born here). That winding staircase you show here is very cool. And Daniel Libeskind has two here as well (the Royal Ontario Museum which was completed a few years ago and we’re waiting to see the second one in the next year or so).
    I think Deconstruction can be great for public spaces… really gets a reaction (good and bad) from people. And that’s what Architecture should do.
    Thanks for the post.
    Olga

    Like

    09/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

    • Thank you for the nice comment, Olga. 🙂

      You are absolutely right! —-> “I think Deconstruction can be great for public spaces… really gets a reaction (good and bad) from people. And that’s what Architecture should do.”

      Like

      10/04/2012 at 12:41 AMApr

  4. It amazes me not only that such construction is possible but the imagination that comes up with it. I don’t know anything about architecture but looking at these pics really makes me appreciate it as an art and science. I can only imagine the sense of fulfillment one must have when seeing their project finished. I think I would be a terrible architect because I wouldn’t want to give away any of these buildings, lol.

    Like

    10/04/2012 at 12:41 AMApr

  5. Your comment reminds me of the speech of Daniel Libeskind that I watched few days ago. He said something like that “buildings that you see outside that are so banal tell you a story, but the story is very short, which says, “We have no story to tell you.” 😀

    Here is a link to this speech (you may saw it already) http://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_libeskind_s_17_words_of_architectural_inspiration.html

    Thank you for dropping by to comment!

    Like

    10/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

  6. Awesome!

    Like

    11/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

    • Glad you like it, Scott!! 😉

      Like

      14/04/2012 at 12:41 AMApr

  7. Very cool.

    Like

    13/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

    • I am glad you like it.
      Thank you so much for dropping by my blog and leaving comments, Anita! 🙂

      Like

      14/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

  8. It seems deconstruction is one of popular themes among young artists. It is refreshing to me!

    Like

    13/04/2012 at 12:41 PMApr

    • Glad you like it 😉
      Thank you for the comment!

      Like

      14/04/2012 at 12:41 AMApr

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